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This is the story of our first six years living in a slum community in Asia and the exciting new approach to orphan-care that was birthed. 

This book is about rediscovering an ancient way of doing mission in the 21st century, as insiders who walk alongside the poor, and a new way of caring for orphans, by working with people rather than for them.

Not just a strong critique of orphanages, The Urban Halo offers the inspiring story of an alternative model of care for vulnerable children.


WHAT READERS ARE SAYING

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"I have this minute finished reading The Urban Halo. It was a gripping read... You are a born story teller, and through the pain and joy in these stories you encourage and strengthen my faith in a God of compassion and justice. Thank you."
Steve Bradbury (Inaugural Chair of the Micah Network)
 

"This book is lived theology at its best."
Michael Duncan (missionary, pastor, lecturer and writer)
 

"A unique story...gripping, compelling, requiring life change and action."
Dr Viv Grigg (Urban Leadership Foundation)
 

"Reiterates with persuasive power that a few, joining hands with others, can do much."
Dr Charles Ringma (Emeritus Professor of Mission Studies, Regent College)
 

“Bought your book. Read it over the last two nights. Bizarrely I cried and cried over the first chapters (not at all like me).”
 

“I thought it would be a nice read on a warm summer's day…How wrong I was. Instead, your book rang true with what we have been thinking and trying to say for a while now but didn't know how to say it…”
 

“I just want to thank you so much for writing the book, The Urban Halo. I have recommended this book to so many of our staff and ministry partners. It has been a real blessing to me and to so many I have passed it on to. It is really helping to change the way we look at caring for orphans…”
 

“Someone has rightly described this book as 'lived theology at its best', and I couldn't agree more.  At first, I was rather skeptical, thinking that it is another one of those books describing one man's experience in the developing world.  A few pages on and I could hardly put it down...”